Strict deadline. Each question must be answered with 150 words or more. Sources and in text citations must be in APA format. Part A 1. Review the purpose of the AAMA. Using the AAMAs Creed and AAMAs Code of Ethics, create a different Creed as if you were a medical assistant. Creed should at least 8 principles. 2. Compare and contrast the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to other common practices in a medical office.

Part A 1. Review the purpose of the AAMA. Using the AAMA’s Creed and AAMA’s Code of Ethics, create a different Creed as if you were a medical assistant. The Creed should include at least 8 principles.

The purpose of the American Association of Medical Assistants (AAMA) is to enhance the profession of medical assisting, promote the highest level of patient care, and establish professional standards for the medical assistant. The AAMA aims to provide medical assistants with resources, opportunities for professional growth, and a platform for advocating their interests.

Drawing from the AAMA’s Creed and Code of Ethics, I propose a different Creed for medical assistants:

1. Respect for patients: I will treat every patient with dignity, compassion, and respect, ensuring their privacy and confidentiality.
2. Integrity: I will act with honesty, transparency, and ethical conduct, adhering to the highest standards of professional behavior.
3. Clinical excellence: I will strive for excellence in my clinical skills, continuously seeking to enhance my knowledge and expertise to provide the best care for patients.
4. Communication: I will communicate effectively, demonstrating active listening, empathy, and clear and concise information exchange with patients, colleagues, and other healthcare professionals.
5. Teamwork: I will collaborate with healthcare team members, recognizing and valuing their contributions, and fostering a harmonious and supportive work environment.
6. Professional growth: I will engage in lifelong learning, pursuing professional development opportunities and staying current with advancements in healthcare to provide the best care to patients.
7. Advocacy: I will advocate for the rights and well-being of patients, promoting access to quality healthcare and social justice.
8. Cultural competency: I will embrace diversity, acknowledging and respecting the cultural, social, and individual differences of patients and colleagues, ensuring inclusive and patient-centered care.

This Creed reflects the core values and principles of the AAMA, emphasizing respect for patients, integrity, clinical excellence, effective communication, teamwork, professional growth, advocacy, and cultural competency.

2. Compare and contrast the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to other common practices in a medical office.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) sets and enforces safety and health standards to protect employees in the workplace. In the context of a medical office, OSHA regulations focus on ensuring a safe and healthy environment for medical assistants and other staff.

One common practice in a medical office is infection control. This includes proper hand hygiene, the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) such as gloves and masks, and adherence to protocols for disinfection and sterilization of medical equipment. OSHA’s requirements for infection control align with the general practices in a medical office, aiming to prevent the transmission of infections and protect both healthcare workers and patients.

Another common practice in a medical office is the management of hazardous materials. OSHA mandates the proper labeling, storage, and handling of hazardous substances such as chemicals and biological materials. This is consistent with the standard practices in a medical office to ensure the safe handling and disposal of potentially dangerous substances.

Additionally, OSHA requires medical offices to have a comprehensive written hazard communication program, which includes training employees on the hazards present in the workplace, providing safety protocols, and making information about hazardous substances easily accessible to employees. Similarly, medical offices commonly have policies in place to educate and train employees about workplace hazards and provide them with the necessary information to work safely.

In contrast, some practices in a medical office may exceed the minimum requirements set by OSHA. For example, a medical office may implement additional precautions for the prevention of workplace violence, such as installing panic buttons or adopting visitor management protocols. While not explicitly required by OSHA, these practices reflect the medical office’s commitment to providing a safe work environment for employees.

Overall, OSHA regulations in a medical office align with common practices related to infection control, hazardous materials management, and hazard communication. While compliance with OSHA requirements is essential, medical offices can go beyond these standards to enhance workplace safety and protect the well-being of their staff.