paraphrase the following excerpts. Note: The name of the…

paraphrase the following excerpts.  Note:  The name of the article and the author and year are provided so you can correctly cite.  Reference list is not required. Matisse is the best painter ever at putting the viewer at the scene. He’s the most realistic of all modern artists, if you admit the feel of the breeze as necessary to a landscape and the smell of oranges as essential to a still life. “The Casbah Gate” depicts the well-known gateway Bab el Aassa, which pierces the southern wall of the city near the sultan’s palace. With scrubby coats of ivory, aqua, blue, and rose delicately fenced by the liveliest gray outline in art history, Matisse gets the essence of a Tangier afternoon, including the subtle presence of the bowaab, the sentry who sits and surveys those who pass through the gate. From Peter Plagens, “Bright Lights.” Newsweek (26 March 1990): 50.

In the article titled “Bright Lights” by Peter Plagens, the author discusses Henri Matisse’s exceptional ability to immerse the viewer in his art. Plagens asserts that Matisse is the most realistic of all modern artists, provided that one acknowledges the importance of sensory experiences such as feeling the breeze in a landscape or smelling oranges in a still life. The artwork in focus here is “The Casbah Gate,” which portrays the famous Bab el Aassa gateway located in the southern wall of Tangier, near the sultan’s palace. Plagens describes Matisse’s technique of applying various colors, including ivory, aqua, blue, and rose, in a scrubby manner. The colors are delicately enclosed by a lively gray outline, which Plagens notes as the liveliest depiction in art history. Through this precise blending of colors and lines, Matisse captures the essence of a Tangier afternoon in his painting. Additionally, Plagens highlights the subtle presence of the bowaab, the sentry who sits and observes those who pass through the gate, as an integral part of Matisse’s representation.

Overall, Plagens emphasizes Matisse’s unparalleled ability to transport the viewer to the portrayed scene through his art. By paying careful attention to details such as the feel of the breeze or the smell of oranges, Matisse achieves a sense of realism that surpasses that of other modern artists. In “The Casbah Gate,” Matisse captures the distinctive atmosphere of a Tangier afternoon, utilizing a palette of ivory, aqua, blue, and rose, while encircling the colors with a vibrant gray outline. This particular artwork portrays the well-known Bab el Aassa gateway, situated in the southern wall of the city near the sultan’s palace. Plagens also mentions the unobtrusive presence of the bowaab, the sentry overseeing those who pass through the gate, as an additional element that Matisse expertly incorporates.

Plagens’s analysis commendably highlights Matisse’s skill in evoking a sense of place and atmosphere through his art. With his unique artistic techniques and attention to sensory details, Matisse not only captures the visual aspects of his subject matter but also imbues his paintings with the intangible elements that truly transport the viewer to the depicted scene. Through “The Casbah Gate,” Matisse creates a vivid and realistic portrayal of a Tangier afternoon, inviting the viewer to experience the ambiance and essence of the location.