Johnson viewed health as efficient and effective functioning of the system, and as behavioral system balance and stability. Behavioral system balance and stability are demonstrated by observed behavior that is purposeful, orderly, and predictable. Consider a clinical-practice situation that demonstrates Johnson’s model of health. How can the nurse support this theory to return the patient to balance and stability? Your initial posting should be at least 400 words in length and utilize at least one scholarly source other than the textbook

Johnson’s model of health, which emphasizes efficiency, effective functioning, behavioral system balance, and stability, provides a theoretical framework for understanding and addressing health-related issues in clinical practice. One clinical-practice situation that demonstrates Johnson’s model of health is the management of diabetes.

Diabetes is a chronic condition characterized by impaired insulin production or utilization, resulting in elevated blood glucose levels. It is a complex health issue that requires a multidimensional approach to achieve balance and stability. According to Johnson’s model, the nurse can support this theory by addressing the physical, psychological, and environmental factors that influence the patient’s health.

Firstly, in terms of physical factors, the nurse can facilitate the patient’s efficient and effective functioning by providing education on diabetes self-care management. This may include information on monitoring blood glucose levels, administering insulin or oral medications, following a balanced diet, engaging in regular physical activity, and managing potential complications. By equipping the patient with knowledge and skills, the nurse helps to empower them to take an active role in their own care and improve their overall health outcomes.

Additionally, the nurse can support behavioral system balance and stability by assisting the patient in identifying and modifying their health-related behaviors. This may involve working collaboratively with the patient to set realistic goals and develop a personalized care plan. For example, the nurse could help the patient develop strategies to incorporate healthier eating habits and regular exercise into their daily routine. By focusing on purposeful, orderly, and predictable behaviors, the nurse helps the patient establish a sense of control and stability in managing their diabetes.

Secondly, in terms of psychological factors, the nurse can support Johnson’s model of health by addressing the patient’s emotional well-being. Diabetes can be a distressing condition that requires continuous self-management, leading to feelings of frustration, anxiety, and even depression. The nurse can provide emotional support by actively listening to the patient’s concerns, empathizing with their experiences, and offering guidance and reassurance. Additionally, the nurse can educate the patient on stress-management techniques and provide resources for emotional support, such as counseling services or support groups. By promoting emotional balance, the nurse helps the patient maintain stability and enhance their overall quality of life.

Lastly, in terms of environmental factors, the nurse can support Johnson’s model of health by assessing and addressing the factors that impact the patient’s health outside of the clinical setting. This may include identifying barriers to medication adherence, access to healthy food options, or opportunities for physical activity. The nurse can collaborate with the patient to develop strategies to overcome these barriers, such as linking the patient to community resources or involving family members in the patient’s care. By addressing the patient’s external environment, the nurse helps create a supportive context for the patient to achieve and maintain balance and stability in managing their diabetes.

In summary, Johnson’s model of health provides a valuable framework for understanding health-related issues in clinical practice. In the case of diabetes management, the nurse can support this theory by addressing physical, psychological, and environmental factors to promote efficient and effective functioning, as well as behavioral system balance and stability. By providing education, assisting with behavior modification, addressing emotional well-being, and addressing environmental factors, the nurse plays a pivotal role in helping the patient achieve and maintain balance and stability in their diabetes management.