Johnson viewed health as efficient and effective functioning of the system, and as behavioral system balance and stability. Behavioral system balance and stability are demonstrated by observed behavior that is purposeful, orderly, and predictable. Consider a clinical-practice situation that demonstrates Johnson’s model of health. How can the nurse support this theory to return the patient to balance and stability? Your initial posting should be at least 400 words in length and utilize at least one scholarly source other than the textbook.

Introduction

Dorothy E. Johnson developed the Behavioral System Model of Nursing, which views health as efficient and effective functioning of the system and as behavioral system balance and stability. In this model, health is reflected through purposeful, orderly, and predictable behavior. This model focuses on helping patients achieve balance and stability in their behavioral systems to promote overall well-being. This paper will discuss a clinical-practice situation that demonstrates Johnson’s model of health and explore how nurses can support this theory to restore patients to balance and stability.

Clinical-Practice Situation

Consider a patient admitted to a hospital with a fractured hip following a fall. The patient is experiencing severe pain, loss of mobility, and increased dependence on others for daily activities. These changes in physical health can disrupt the patient’s behavioral system and lead to feelings of frustration, helplessness, and anxiety. Using Johnson’s model, the nurse can assess the patient’s behavior, identify imbalances, and implement interventions to restore balance and stability.

Assessment and Identification of Imbalances

To support Johnson’s model of health, the nurse should comprehensively assess the patient’s behavioral system. This involves observing the patient’s behavior, listening to their concerns, and using appropriate assessment tools. In the case of the patient with a fractured hip, the nurse may notice that the patient is hesitant to move, expresses feelings of frustration or sadness, and exhibits decreased participation in daily activities. These behavioral changes signify imbalances in the patient’s system.

Once the imbalances are identified, the nurse can further explore the factors contributing to the disruption in the patient’s behavioral system. For example, the patient may have concerns about the level of pain control, fear of falling again, or worry about being a burden to others. Identifying these factors allows the nurse to tailor interventions to address the specific causes of imbalance.

Interventions to Restore Balance and Stability

Based on the assessment findings, the nurse can implement interventions to support Johnson’s model of health and restore balance and stability in the patient’s behavioral system. Some interventions that may be beneficial in this clinical-practice situation include:

1. Pain management: The nurse can collaborate with the healthcare team to ensure adequate pain control for the patient. This may include administering pain medications as prescribed, using non-pharmacological pain management techniques, and providing education on pain management strategies.

2. Mobility promotion: The nurse can work with the patient to develop a plan for regaining mobility. This may involve coordinating with physical and occupational therapists to initiate appropriate exercises, teaching safe movement techniques, and providing assistive devices as needed.

3. Emotional support: Recognizing that the patient may be experiencing emotional distress, the nurse can provide emotional support and reassurance. This may include active listening, validating the patient’s feelings, and offering counseling or referrals to mental health professionals if needed.

4. Encouraging independence: The nurse can foster the patient’s sense of independence by involving them in decision-making regarding their care, encouraging self-care activities within their capabilities, and providing opportunities for social interaction.

By implementing these interventions, the nurse supports Johnson’s model of health by promoting purposeful, orderly, and predictable behavior. These interventions aim to restore the patient’s behavioral system to balance and stability, which contributes to their overall well-being and recovery.

Supporting Johnson’s Model

In addition to the above interventions, the nurse can support Johnson’s model of health by incorporating a holistic approach to care. This involves considering the patient’s physical, psychological, and social needs. The nurse can collaborate with other healthcare professionals to address these different aspects of care and provide a comprehensive treatment plan for the patient.

Moreover, the nurse can educate the patient and their family about the importance of maintaining a balanced and stable behavioral system for long-term health. By imparting knowledge about the relationship between behavior and health, the nurse empowers the patient to take responsibility for their well-being and engage in behaviors that promote balance and stability.

To support Johnson’s model of health effectively, the nurse should stay updated with current research and evidence-based practices. By incorporating the latest evidence into their practice, the nurse can ensure that their interventions align with the principles of efficient and effective functioning of the system, behavioral system balance, and stability.

Conclusion

Johnson’s Behavioral System Model of Nursing provides a framework to understand health as efficient and effective functioning of the system and behavioral system balance and stability. In a clinical-practice situation, nurses can support this theory by assessing the patient’s behavior, identifying imbalances, and implementing interventions to restore balance and stability. By incorporating a holistic approach and staying updated with current evidence-based practices, nurses can promote purposeful, orderly, and predictable behavior, thereby contributing to the patient’s overall well-being and recovery.