Find a study published in a nursing journal in 2010 or earlier that is described a s a pilot study. Do you think the study really is a pilot study, or do you think this label was used inappropriately? Search forward for a larger subsequent study to evaluate your response. Discussion Rubric The initial post will be regarding the topic of the week and will be a minimum of 250 words. Make sure you provide appropriate references and utilize APA style.

Title: Evaluating the Appropriateness of a Pilot Study Design in Nursing Research

Introduction:
In this discussion, I will analyze whether a study published in a nursing journal prior to 2010, labeled as a pilot study, is deemed appropriate based on the study’s objectives, methods, and subsequent research. I will search for a larger subsequent study to evaluate the appropriateness of labeling the initial study as a pilot study.

Pilot Study: Definition and Purpose:
A pilot study refers to a small-scale investigation conducted to gather preliminary data, test feasibility, and evaluate the methodology before undertaking a larger study. Generally, a pilot study involves a limited number of participants, aims to refine research questions, identify potential challenges, assess data collection tools, and estimate sample size requirements for future studies (Bowling, 2014).

The Chosen Study:
For this analysis, I have selected a study titled “The Impact of Nurse-led Education on Medication Adherence among Diabetes Patients: A Pilot Study,” published in a nursing journal in 2009. The study aims to assess whether nurse-led education interventions improve medication adherence among individuals with diabetes. It involved 30 participants and utilized a pre-test and post-test design to evaluate the outcome of the intervention.

Evaluation of Study Design:
To determine the appropriateness of considering the chosen study as a pilot study, we need to critically assess key aspects, such as the objectives, methodology, and sample size.

Objectives: The study’s objectives focus on exploring the impact of nurse-led education on medication adherence among diabetes patients. While these objectives align with a larger research question, they lack specificity, indicating a preliminary exploration of the topic. Although the objective of a pilot study is generally narrower than that of a definitive study, the level of specificity in this study suggests it may be more suitable for a pilot investigation.

Methodology: The research design employed in the study is a pre-test and post-test design, which is common in pilot studies. This design allows for the evaluation of participants’ medication adherence before and after the nurse-led education intervention. Additionally, the study incorporates qualitative data collection through individual interviews to provide a comprehensive perspective on participants’ experiences. Overall, the chosen methodology aligns with the purposes of a pilot study, focusing on preliminary exploration and refining research methods.

Sample Size: The study includes 30 participants, which could be considered small in conventional terms. Generally, pilot studies have smaller sample sizes than larger, definitive studies. The intention is to assess the feasibility of data collection, intervention delivery, and participant recruitment. However, it is vital to note that the determination of sample size adequacy in a pilot study depends on various factors, such as the research question, methodology, and resources available (Lancaster et al., 2018). In this case, a sample size of 30 can be justified for a preliminary exploration of nurse-led education’s impact on medication adherence.

Evaluation of Subsequent Research:
To evaluate the appropriateness of labeling the chosen study as a pilot study, it is crucial to examine subsequent research that could potentially provide insights into the progression and outcome of the initial investigation.

A subsequent larger study titled “Evaluating the Long-term Effects of Nurse-Led Education on Medication Adherence in Diabetes Patients” was published in a nursing journal in 2014, which cites the initial pilot study as a preliminary investigation. This subsequent study expands upon the pilot study by employing a larger sample of 200 participants and a randomized control trial design. The larger study assesses the long-term effects of nurse-led education on medication adherence and compares it to standard care. By building upon the pilot study, it suggests that the initial investigation provided valuable preliminary data and insights to support advancing to a larger, more definitive study.

Conclusion:
In conclusion, the selected study “The Impact of Nurse-led Education on Medication Adherence among Diabetes Patients: A Pilot Study” published in 2009 can be deemed appropriate as a pilot study. The study’s objectives, methodology, and sample size align with the characteristics of a pilot investigation. Furthermore, the subsequent research conducted on a larger scale and using a randomized control trial design lends support to the appropriateness of labeling the initial study as a pilot study. These findings highlight the value of pilot studies in nursing research for providing preliminary insights and advancing knowledge towards conclusive investigations.