End-of-life care becomes an issue at some point for elderly clients. Even with the emergence of palliative care programs and hospice programs, the majority of elderly people do not die in their own home as is their preference. What are the reasons for this trend? Discuss what you can do as a nurse to support your clients in end-of-life care and in supporting their desires. Support your response with evidence-based literature. MINIMUM OF 2 REFERENCES. 400 WORDS. NO PLAGIARISM PLEASE

Introduction

End-of-life care is a crucial aspect of nursing practice, especially for elderly clients. However, it is observed that the majority of elderly people do not die in their own homes, which is often their preference. This trend raises important questions about the reasons behind it and what nurses can do to support their clients’ desires for end-of-life care. In this essay, we will discuss the reasons for this trend and explore evidence-based strategies that nurses can employ to support their clients in end-of-life care.

Reasons for the Trend

Several factors contribute to the trend of elderly clients not being able to die in their own homes. One significant reason is the lack of access to appropriate palliative care and hospice services. Palliative care programs and hospice programs have emerged in recent years, aiming to provide specialized care for individuals with life-limiting illnesses. However, there are often limitations in terms of availability and geographical reach, making it challenging for elderly clients to receive care in their own homes.

Another reason for this trend is the preference for hospital-based care among elderly clients and their families. For many people, hospitals are seen as a place for comprehensive and specialized medical care. The common belief is that hospitals have the necessary resources and expertise to manage and control symptoms effectively, which may not be available in home-based settings. Therefore, elderly clients and their families may opt for institutional care, leading to the end-of-life occurring outside the home.

Furthermore, the fear and stigma associated with death play a role in this trend. Society often views death as a taboo topic and avoids discussing it openly. This can result in elderly clients and their families feeling uncomfortable or unprepared to address end-of-life care needs at home. Consequently, they may turn to institutional settings where death is perceived to be managed more effectively and away from the daily routines and memories associated with home.

Nursing Strategies to Support Clients’ Desires

As nurses, there are several evidence-based strategies that can be employed to support clients’ desires for end-of-life care in their own homes. Firstly, effective communication and collaboration with clients, their families, and the interdisciplinary team are crucial. Open and honest discussions about end-of-life preferences and goals of care can help identify the client’s desires and provide appropriate information and support.

Additionally, nurses can advocate for increased access to palliative care and hospice services in the community. By collaborating with healthcare organizations, policymakers, and community leaders, nurses can work towards ensuring that these services are readily available to elderly clients in their homes. This may involve participating in local initiatives, conducting research, and promoting public awareness regarding the benefits of home-based end-of-life care.

Furthermore, education and training for both healthcare professionals and the general public are essential. By providing education on end-of-life care, symptom management, and advance care planning, nurses can empower clients and their families to make informed decisions about their care. This education should also address the cultural, spiritual, and psychosocial aspects of end-of-life care to create a holistic approach that respects individuals’ beliefs and values.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the trend of elderly clients not being able to die in their own homes is influenced by factors such as limited access to palliative care and hospice services, the preference for hospital-based care, and the fear and stigma associated with death. As nurses, it is our responsibility to support our clients’ desires for end-of-life care. This can be achieved through effective communication, advocacy for increased access to services, and education and training for both healthcare professionals and the general public. By implementing evidence-based strategies, nurses can make a significant impact on improving end-of-life care experiences for elderly clients.