Describe the developmental markers a nurse should assess for a 9-month-old female infant. Discuss the recommendations you would give the mother. Explain why these recommendations are based on evidence-based practice. A mother comes in with 9-month-old girl. The infant is 68.5cm in length (25th percentile per CDC growth chart), weighs 6.75kg (5th percentile per CDC growth chart), and has a head circumference of 43cm (25th percentile per CDC growth chart). Purchase the answer to view it Purchase the answer to view it

Developmental assessment is an essential component of pediatric nursing practice, as it allows nurses to monitor the growth and development of infants and identify any potential delays or abnormalities. In the case of a 9-month-old female infant, there are several developmental markers that a nurse should assess and discuss with the mother. These markers include physical growth, motor skills, language and communication, social development, and cognitive abilities.

Physical Growth:
The nurse should assess the length, weight, and head circumference of the 9-month-old female infant. The infant’s length of 68.5cm falls within the 25th percentile on the CDC growth chart, indicating that she is slightly shorter than average compared to other infants her age. Similarly, the infant’s weight of 6.75kg falls within the 5th percentile, suggesting that she is lighter than most infants her age. The head circumference of 43cm falls within the 25th percentile, indicating that her head size is within the normal range. Based on these measurements, it is essential to discuss the growth pattern with the mother and ensure that the infant is receiving adequate nutrition and healthcare.

Motor Skills:
At 9 months of age, the infant should demonstrate gross and fine motor skills. Gross motor skills include sitting without support, crawling, and pulling up to a standing position using furniture. Fine motor skills involve picking up objects using the pincer grasp and transferring objects from one hand to the other. The nurse should assess whether the infant can sit without support, crawl, and pull up to stand. Additionally, the nurse should observe the infant’s hand coordination and ability to pick up and manipulate small objects. If any delays or abnormalities are identified, the nurse should refer the infant for further evaluation and intervention.

Language and Communication:
The 9-month-old infant should demonstrate emerging language and communication skills. This includes babbling, imitating sounds, responding to her name, and using gestures like waving or pointing. The nurse should assess whether the infant is babbling and making attempts to imitate sounds. Additionally, the nurse should observe if the infant responds when her name is called and whether she uses gestures to communicate. If there are concerns regarding language and communication development, the nurse should discuss these with the mother and consider referral for further assessment.

Social Development:
Social development involves the infant’s ability to engage with others, show interest in their surroundings, and demonstrate attachment to primary caregivers. At 9 months of age, the infant should display social interaction and engagement. The nurse should observe whether the infant makes eye contact, responds to social cues, and shows interest in her surroundings. Additionally, the nurse should assess the infant’s attachment to her mother and evaluate the quality of their interaction. If there are any concerns regarding social development, the nurse should provide guidance and support to the mother.

Cognitive Abilities:
Cognitive development refers to the infant’s ability to think, reason, and solve problems. At 9 months of age, the infant should demonstrate curiosity, exploration, and problem-solving skills. The nurse should assess whether the infant explores her environment, uses objects for different purposes, and demonstrates problem-solving abilities. Additionally, the nurse should observe the infant’s ability to imitate actions, recognize familiar faces or objects, and engage in simple games like peek-a-boo. If any delays or concerns are identified, the nurse should discuss these with the mother and provide appropriate recommendations.