Chapter 12 – Personal Loss Question: 1- Compare the Adaptive grieving model (Martin & Doka, 2000) and the Dual Process model (Stroebe & Schut, 2001). 2- What are the similarities and differences? Which seems to fit best to your style of counseling? Why is that so? Guidelines: format, Original papers ( ). The answer should be based on the knowledge obtained from reading the book power point attached). Textbook: Crisis Intervention Strategies Author: Richard K. James; Burl E. Gilliland ISBN: 978-1-111-18677-7

Chapter 12 of the textbook “Crisis Intervention Strategies” explores the topic of personal loss, specifically focusing on grief and the different models that aim to explain the grieving process. This assignment requires comparing the Adaptive grieving model (Martin & Doka, 2000) and the Dual Process model (Stroebe & Schut, 2001), identifying their similarities and differences, and determining which one fits best with a personal counseling style.

The Adaptive grieving model, developed by Martin and Doka in 2000, emphasizes the concept of adaptation in the grieving process. This model posits that grief is a dynamic and evolving process that varies from person to person. It highlights the importance of individual differences and the notion that individuals adapt and, in some instances, develop resilience following a loss. The model also suggests that adaptive grieving consists of six components: shock/disbelief, developing awareness, restitution, resolving the loss, idealizing the deceased, and accommodation.

On the other hand, the Dual Process model, proposed by Stroebe and Schut in 2001, posits that grieving involves oscillation between loss-oriented and restoration-oriented processes. This model recognizes that individuals need to actively engage in both aspects to effectively cope with loss. Loss-oriented processes involve facing the pain of loss, such as expressing emotions and longing for the deceased, while restoration-oriented processes involve attending to life changes and adapting to a world without the deceased. The Dual Process model emphasizes the importance of balancing both aspects of grieving and engaging in oscillation between them.

Although the Adaptive grieving model and the Dual Process model approach grief from different perspectives, they share some similarities. Both models acknowledge that the grieving process is individual and can vary greatly between individuals. They recognize that there is no universal or linear path of grieving, and that each person’s experience is unique. Additionally, both models highlight the significance of adaptation and the need to adjust to a changed reality.

Despite these similarities, there are also some notable differences between the two models. The Adaptive grieving model focuses more on the psychological and emotional aspects of grieving, with an emphasis on the individual’s internal processes. In contrast, the Dual Process model considers both the emotional and practical aspects of grieving, highlighting the importance of attending to life changes and engaging in practical tasks associated with the loss. This model acknowledges the need for individuals to shift their focus between the internal emotional aspects and the external practical aspects of grief.

In terms of fitting with a personal counseling style, the choice between the two models will depend on the counselor’s theoretical orientation and personal approach to counseling. If a counselor values addressing the internal emotional aspects of grief and promoting individual adaptation, the Adaptive grieving model may be a better fit. However, if a counselor believes in the importance of balancing the emotional and practical aspects of grieving, and recognizes the need for oscillation between them, the Dual Process model may align more closely with their counseling style.

It is important to note that the choice of model should not be seen as mutually exclusive. Counselors can integrate elements from both models into their practice, tailoring their approach to the unique needs of each client. Furthermore, counselors should also consider other factors such as the client’s cultural background, individual preferences, and specific circumstances surrounding the loss.

In conclusion, the Adaptive grieving model and the Dual Process model provide different perspectives on the grieving process. While the Adaptive model focuses on individual adaptation and internal emotional processes, the Dual Process model emphasizes the importance of balance between loss-oriented and restoration-oriented processes. The choice between these models depends on the counselor’s theoretical orientation and personal style of counseling, as well as the specific needs and circumstances of the client.