APA format 2 pages 3 references 1 from walden university library due Thursday 10/10/19 at 7pm EST Clinical imagination asks students to step outside of the [sometimes] ‘narrow box’ of academia to develop multiple solutions to a situation. In the above quote, Patricia Benner notes how simulations can transition students from knowledge acquisition to knowledge use. However, in order for nurse educators to transform simulations into a teaching technique, they must make every effort to ensure the simulation technology is invisible. To do this, nurse educators should prepare students for the simulation by reiterating that that the goal is not how the works, but rather the how the works. In addition, highlighting the clinical expertise, critical thinking, collaboration, and technical prowess needed during simulated clinical experiences (SCE) is the true key to bridging the gap between classroom and clinical instruction. Allowing focus to shift too much towards the simulation itself might cause learners to lose sight of the actual objectives of the lesson- thus failing to prepare them for the real demands and consequences of the health care environment.

Clinical imagination is a concept that encourages students to think beyond the confines of traditional academia and explore multiple solutions to a given situation. Patricia Benner highlights the role that simulations play in helping students transition from the acquisition of knowledge to its practical application (Benner, 2012). However, in order for nurse educators to effectively utilize simulations as a teaching technique, they must ensure that the technology used for simulations remains invisible to the students.

To make simulations appear seamless and integrate them into the curriculum, nurse educators must prepare students beforehand by emphasizing that the focus should not be on how the simulation works, but rather on how to apply the knowledge gained through the simulation (Kaplan et al., 2017). By setting this expectation, students are less likely to get caught up in the technical aspects of the simulation, allowing them to concentrate on developing their clinical expertise.

Furthermore, it is crucial for nurse educators to emphasize the skills required to succeed in simulated clinical experiences (SCE). These skills include critical thinking, collaboration, and technical prowess, all of which are essential for bridging the gap between classroom instruction and real-world clinical practice (Lasater, 2014). By highlighting these skills, nurse educators can maintain the focus on the intended objectives of the simulation and prepare students for the challenges they will face in the healthcare environment.

If the focus of a simulation shifts too much towards the technology itself, learners may lose sight of the true purpose of the lesson and fail to grasp the real demands and consequences of the healthcare setting. By keeping the technology in the background and making it transparent to the students, nurse educators can ensure that the simulation remains a means to an end rather than an end in itself (Kaplan et al., 2017). This approach helps students connect theoretical knowledge with practical application and enhances their ability to think critically and make informed decisions in real-world scenarios.

Seamless integration of technology in simulations requires careful planning and preparation on the part of nurse educators. It is essential to select simulation tools and software that are intuitive and user-friendly, minimizing the learning curve for students and allowing them to focus on the content rather than the technology (Kaplan et al., 2017). Additionally, nurse educators should provide clear instructions and guidance before and during the simulation, ensuring that students understand the objectives and how to navigate the simulation effectively.

One helpful strategy for bridging the gap between classroom and clinical instruction is to incorporate debriefing sessions after a simulated experience. Debriefing allows students to reflect on their performance, identify areas for improvement, and gain insight into their clinical reasoning and decision-making processes (Peters et al., 2018). By facilitating meaningful discussions during debriefing sessions, nurse educators can reinforce the connection between theory and practice, encourage critical thinking, and promote self-reflection among students.

In conclusion, simulations offer a valuable tool for nurse educators to engage students in active learning and bridge the gap between classroom instruction and real-world clinical practice. To make simulations effective, nurse educators must ensure that the technology used for simulations remains invisible and that the focus remains on the application of knowledge rather than the technical aspects of the simulation. Emphasizing the skills required for success in simulated clinical experiences and incorporating debriefing sessions can further enhance the educational value of simulations. By employing these strategies, nurse educators can foster clinical imagination and prepare students for the challenges they will face in the healthcare environment.