According to the assigned article, “Health Disparity and Structural Violence: How Fear Undermines Health Among Immigrants at Risk for Diabetes,” narratives tell the story of the interconnectedness between fear and health. Thematically, the issue of is a dominant feature that affects how an individual approaches day-to-day living and health. Explain the relationship between fear and health identified by the researchers in the article. Do you agree that structural violence perpetuates health disparity? Purchase the answer to view it

The article “Health Disparity and Structural Violence: How Fear Undermines Health Among Immigrants at Risk for Diabetes” explores the connection between fear and health among immigrants at risk for diabetes. The researchers argue that fear plays a significant role in shaping health outcomes for this population, and that structural violence perpetuates health disparities. In this response, we will examine the relationship between fear and health as identified by the researchers and evaluate the claim that structural violence contributes to health disparities.

The researchers argue that fear is a pervasive component in the lives of immigrants at risk for diabetes. They explain that fear can manifest in different ways, such as fear of deportation, fear of discrimination, and fear of seeking medical care. These fears are rooted in structural violence, which refers to systematic forms of violence that are embedded within social structures and institutions. For example, policies that target immigrants and contribute to their marginalization can evoke fear and anxiety. This, in turn, affects their ability to access healthcare services and maintain good health.

Furthermore, the researchers propose that fear can have a direct physiological impact on health. They discuss how chronic fear and stress activate the body’s stress response system, leading to increased levels of stress hormones like cortisol. Prolonged exposure to stress hormones can have detrimental effects on the immune system, cardiovascular system, and metabolic processes, ultimately increasing the risk of chronic diseases like diabetes. In this way, fear not only influences healthcare-seeking behaviors but also has a direct impact on physical health outcomes.

The article emphasizes how structural violence perpetuates health disparities. Structural violence refers to the systemic ways in which social structures and institutions harm certain groups of people. In the case of immigrants at risk for diabetes, the researchers argue that policies and practices that target and marginalize this population contribute to their vulnerability and hinder their ability to access adequate healthcare. This results in disparities in health outcomes between immigrants and the general population.

The researchers provide examples of structural violence, such as immigration policies that restrict access to healthcare for undocumented immigrants. They argue that these policies create barriers to preventive care, early intervention, and treatment for chronic conditions, contributing to poorer health outcomes for immigrants. Moreover, structural violence is also evident in discriminatory practices within the healthcare system, where immigrants may encounter bias and racism, leading to inadequate care and distrust in healthcare providers.

In evaluating the claim that structural violence perpetuates health disparities, it is important to consider the available evidence. Research consistently supports the link between social determinants of health, such as poverty, discrimination, and immigration status, and health disparities. Structural violence acts as a mechanism through which these determinants impact health outcomes, exacerbating health disparities among marginalized populations.

Studies have shown that immigrants, particularly those who are undocumented or have limited access to healthcare, experience higher rates of chronic diseases, including diabetes. This suggests that structural factors, such as discrimination and limited healthcare access, contribute to disparities in health outcomes. Furthermore, qualitative research, as presented in the article, provides narratives that support the claim that fear of deportation and discrimination affects healthcare-seeking behaviors and ultimately health outcomes.

In conclusion, the article highlights the relationship between fear and health among immigrants at risk for diabetes. The researchers argue that fear, often rooted in structural violence, plays a significant role in shaping healthcare-seeking behaviors and physical health outcomes. Structural violence perpetuates health disparities by creating barriers to healthcare access and contributing to marginalized populations’ vulnerability. The evidence supports the claim that structural violence contributes to health disparities, and further research is needed to address these underlying social determinants of health and promote health equity for all populations.